Reviews

The Worm and His Kings by Hailey Piper

by @Asenath Cosmic horror plays with the horror of the incomprehensible, where knowledge comes with a steep price and powerful entities view humans as ants. Hailey Piper takes cosmic horror’s preoccupation with alienation and insignificance and instead places it firmly within the familiar—homeless populations. This human touch is usually the antithesis of cosmic horror, but… Continue reading The Worm and His Kings by Hailey Piper

Reviews

The Wych Elm by Tana French

by Christopher O’Halloran (@BurgleInfernal) According to the US 2020 census, 36 million Americans identify their primary ethnicity as Irish—four times the actual population of Ireland. Over 5.6 million people around the world are using the language-learning app Duolingo to learn Irish. No backyard griller is without an apron saying, “Kiss me, I’m Irish.”People love Irish… Continue reading The Wych Elm by Tana French

Reviews

The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter

by @Asenath Fairy tales cover diverse ground, from retellings of historical events to cultural in-jokes, but some of the most popular and longest enduring are tales about behavior, especially the behavior of women. Though queer and feminist takes on fairy tales are common today, with reimaginings written by everyone from Helen Oyeyemi to Margaret Atwood,… Continue reading The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter

Reviews

The Hellbound Heart By Clive Barker

by Christopher O’Halloran (@BurgleInfernal) There are authors who write to change the world. Those who are able to create such beauty and wonder in words that a reader’s life is forever changed. Authors who astound with their brilliance.Then there’s Clive Barker—often credited with kickstarting the splatterpunk movement—doing his best to make your stomach turn and… Continue reading The Hellbound Heart By Clive Barker

Reviews

A Choir of Ill Children by Tom Piccirilli

by Lindsey Ragsdale (@Leviathan15) Horror novels set in small, isolated towns are a dime a dozen. The idea of characters harboring their own dark secrets, while simultaneously wanting to know every bit of their neighbor’s business, is a familiar and successful trope in fiction. Perhaps this is because many readers are all-too-familiar with this setting,… Continue reading A Choir of Ill Children by Tom Piccirilli